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In the critical notes at the foot of the page, which, for obvious reasons of general convenience, are written in Latin, the manuscript readings are recorded, together with all the conjectural emendations that appeared for any reason to deserve notice, and also the principal variations occurring in the text as printed in nine previous editions.

This loss may, of course, have been due to accident alone; a single leaf in the manuscript from which our only copy of the latter half of the play was transcribed, may have been torn out, simply because it was near the close of the volume; but it may also be worth suggestingr that the end of the lxvi AIN7TR OD UCTION. For comparison with the above passage, we can only quote the few following lines: 'High above there grow, With intersecting trunks, from crag to crag, Cedars, and yews, and pines; whose tangled hair Is matted in one solid roof of shade By the dark ivy's twine.' ONr THE MESSENGERS' SPEE CHES. | ~ nature are probably intended to be characteristic of * the enthusiasm of the votaries of Dionysus, whose favourite haunts are to be found in the woodland solitudes and on the lonely hills (e.g. i ~ ~ 1 1On the general subject of the Greek view of the picturesque in nature, see further, in Ruskin's Modern Painters, part IV, chap. 118-124; and i [[

This loss may, of course, have been due to accident alone; a single leaf in the manuscript from which our only copy of the latter half of the play was transcribed, may have been torn out, simply because it was near the close of the volume; but it may also be worth suggestingr that the end of the lxvi AIN7TR OD UCTION. For comparison with the above passage, we can only quote the few following lines: 'High above there grow, With intersecting trunks, from crag to crag, Cedars, and yews, and pines; whose tangled hair Is matted in one solid roof of shade By the dark ivy's twine.' ONr THE MESSENGERS' SPEE CHES. | ~ nature are probably intended to be characteristic of * the enthusiasm of the votaries of Dionysus, whose favourite haunts are to be found in the woodland solitudes and on the lonely hills (e.g. i ~ ~ 1 1On the general subject of the Greek view of the picturesque in nature, see further, in Ruskin's Modern Painters, part IV, chap. 118-124; and i \0Ti; Woermann, Uebcr deln landschaftlichen Aatursinn der Griechcen nmd Riomer, Miinchen, 1871, pp. The chorus in Greek tragedy is, again and again, the interpreter to the audience of the inner meaning of the action of the play; and the moral reflexions which are to be found in the lyrical portions of the Bacchae seem in several instances to be all the more likely to be meant to express the poet's own opinions, when we observe that they are not entirely in keeping S. We are told, for example, that 'to be knowing is not to be wise'; that, in other words, it is folly to be wise in one's own conceit (395); that the true wisdom consists in holding aloof from those who set themselves up to be wiser than their fellows, and in acquiescing contentedly in the common sense of ordinary men (427). The most memorable instance of the same subject is the masterpiece of Scopas which is the theme of several epigrams of the Greek Anthology (Alnth. On the other hand, in a relief formerly in the Borghese collection (Winckelmann, no. He elsewhere recognises a fresh development of Greek art under the influence of Tragedy, a development which shewed itself not only in the groups of that sculptor but also in single figures like that of his Maenad (p. The height of the original is I foot, 5 inches; the woodcut is copied from the engraving in the British i Museum Marbles x plate 35. She is seated under a tree and has just opened the sacred basket, out of which a snake is seen emerging. DANCING FAUN, with head tossed back and hair floating in the breeze, bunches of grapes in his right hand, and a panther's skin over his right arm. with Latin translation by Aemilius Portus, Heidelberg, I597; (3) Paul Stephens, Geneva, 1602 [the ed. I855 [2 vols., with full ayparatus criticus at the end of each volume]; (II) A. I867 [3 vols., with a few of the more important various readings and emendations at the foot of the page]; (12) Nauck ed. with introduction 'de Euripidis vita' &c., and 'annotatio critica']; (I3) 1W.

Indeed, it could hardly have been undertaken at all, but for the existence of that excellent institution, the University Long Vacation,-an institution against which a few bold hands have been lately lifted, but which nevertheless, in the PREFA CE.

nii form in which we are familiar with it in the Colleges of Cambridge, where residence under due limitations is allowed but not enforced, has a value, for teachers and learners alike, which it would be difficult to overestimate.

The Iambic lines, in general, are remarkable for the large number of resolved feet, which is one of the marks of the poet's later manner'. Of both the messengers' speeches we may almost say, as has been lately said of the dramas of Calderon, that 'the scenery is lighted up with unknown and preternatural splendour.' The account of the catastrophe in the second speech is remarkably vigorous. 1 Im Labyrinth der Thilecr hinzuschleichen, Dann diesen Felsen zu r-steigenz, VTon den der Quell sich ewig sprude Ind stiirzt, Das ist die Lust, die solche Pfade wiirzt! A partial solution of the difficulty is not far to seek. The oracle of the god, who had caused his fall, replied that only he that had dealt the wound could cure the same, and the king was healed by Achilles with the rust of his spear. S.; the woodcut is borrowed from the vignette of King's Antique Gems and Ri Zngs, where the copy is drawn to twice the actual size of the gem. The lamp was found at Dali, the ancient Idalium, in 1871, and was sent by Mr Consul Sandwith to the Rev.

But the poet appears to have been conscious of this difficulty, as he makes Pentheus thireaten to put a stop to it (1. 545, 1036); and the king is only prevented from actually doing so by his anxiety to capture the Lydian stranger; but as soon as he has succeeded in this object, he becomes hopelessly entangled in toils that leave him no chance of carrying out his threat. The choral metres, a conspectus of which is given at the close of the volume, are all of them admirably adapted to give expression to the varied emotions of the votaries of Dionysus. 604-64I, is well suited as a transition from the hurried excitement of the preceding scene, to the quieter Iambic verses which immediately follow it. Of the versification of the Bacchae, according to Ilartung's Eu:. In listening to the first speech, we find ourselves in a wonderland where all is marvellous, and we feel that here, at any rate, we have one who, like Aristophanes in his lighter moods, would have been able to appreciate a creation of the fancy like the MIidsummzer Nighzt's Dream of our own poet. The subject of this quiet and easy conversation gives that repose so necessary to the mind, after the tumultuous bustle of the preceding scenes, and perfectly contrasts the scene of horror that immediately succeeds'.' Another instance of the 'lull before the storm' is noticed by a recent writer on Calderon, in 'the pretty pastoral scene' in the play called the Hair of Absalom where the sheep-shearers are pleasantly conversing with Tamar just before the arrival of Amnon and his brothers3. Is the poet who here upholds the honour of Dionysus, and maintains the belief in his divinity, the same as he who, elsewhere, allows his characters to rail unrebuked against the legends of the popular mythology, and even to deny the wisdom of Apollo, the justice of Athene, the righteousness of Zeus2, and to speak in vague terms of the very existence of the greatest of the gods'? The gem is characterized by Mr King as 'Etruscan work of the most finished kind' (King and Munro's Horace, Epod. The original is in the Berlin cabinet, and a cast of it is included in the collection mentioned on p. The woodcut is enlarged to double the scale of the gem. His wound is here indicated by a bandage round his ankle and by the 'writhing anguish' expressed in his general attitude. A Maenad with head tossed back and streaming hair, and with arms violently extended, holding a short sword in her right and part of a slain animal in her left; she wears the long chiton, and over it the nebris.

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This loss may, of course, have been due to accident alone; a single leaf in the manuscript from which our only copy of the latter half of the play was transcribed, may have been torn out, simply because it was near the close of the volume; but it may also be worth suggestingr that the end of the lxvi AIN7TR OD UCTION. For comparison with the above passage, we can only quote the few following lines: 'High above there grow, With intersecting trunks, from crag to crag, Cedars, and yews, and pines; whose tangled hair Is matted in one solid roof of shade By the dark ivy's twine.' ONr THE MESSENGERS' SPEE CHES. | ~ nature are probably intended to be characteristic of * the enthusiasm of the votaries of Dionysus, whose favourite haunts are to be found in the woodland solitudes and on the lonely hills (e.g. i ~ ~ 1 1On the general subject of the Greek view of the picturesque in nature, see further, in Ruskin's Modern Painters, part IV, chap. 118-124; and i \0Ti; Woermann, Uebcr deln landschaftlichen Aatursinn der Griechcen nmd Riomer, Miinchen, 1871, pp. The chorus in Greek tragedy is, again and again, the interpreter to the audience of the inner meaning of the action of the play; and the moral reflexions which are to be found in the lyrical portions of the Bacchae seem in several instances to be all the more likely to be meant to express the poet's own opinions, when we observe that they are not entirely in keeping S. We are told, for example, that 'to be knowing is not to be wise'; that, in other words, it is folly to be wise in one's own conceit (395); that the true wisdom consists in holding aloof from those who set themselves up to be wiser than their fellows, and in acquiescing contentedly in the common sense of ordinary men (427). The most memorable instance of the same subject is the masterpiece of Scopas which is the theme of several epigrams of the Greek Anthology (Alnth. On the other hand, in a relief formerly in the Borghese collection (Winckelmann, no. He elsewhere recognises a fresh development of Greek art under the influence of Tragedy, a development which shewed itself not only in the groups of that sculptor but also in single figures like that of his Maenad (p. The height of the original is I foot, 5 inches; the woodcut is copied from the engraving in the British i Museum Marbles x plate 35. She is seated under a tree and has just opened the sacred basket, out of which a snake is seen emerging. DANCING FAUN, with head tossed back and hair floating in the breeze, bunches of grapes in his right hand, and a panther's skin over his right arm. with Latin translation by Aemilius Portus, Heidelberg, I597; (3) Paul Stephens, Geneva, 1602 [the ed. I855 [2 vols., with full ayparatus criticus at the end of each volume]; (II) A. I867 [3 vols., with a few of the more important various readings and emendations at the foot of the page]; (12) Nauck ed. with introduction 'de Euripidis vita' &c., and 'annotatio critica']; (I3) 1W. Indeed, it could hardly have been undertaken at all, but for the existence of that excellent institution, the University Long Vacation,-an institution against which a few bold hands have been lately lifted, but which nevertheless, in the PREFA CE. nii form in which we are familiar with it in the Colleges of Cambridge, where residence under due limitations is allowed but not enforced, has a value, for teachers and learners alike, which it would be difficult to overestimate. The Iambic lines, in general, are remarkable for the large number of resolved feet, which is one of the marks of the poet's later manner'. Of both the messengers' speeches we may almost say, as has been lately said of the dramas of Calderon, that 'the scenery is lighted up with unknown and preternatural splendour.' The account of the catastrophe in the second speech is remarkably vigorous. 1 Im Labyrinth der Thilecr hinzuschleichen, Dann diesen Felsen zu r-steigenz, VTon den der Quell sich ewig sprude Ind stiirzt, Das ist die Lust, die solche Pfade wiirzt! A partial solution of the difficulty is not far to seek. The oracle of the god, who had caused his fall, replied that only he that had dealt the wound could cure the same, and the king was healed by Achilles with the rust of his spear. S.; the woodcut is borrowed from the vignette of King's Antique Gems and Ri Zngs, where the copy is drawn to twice the actual size of the gem. The lamp was found at Dali, the ancient Idalium, in 1871, and was sent by Mr Consul Sandwith to the Rev. But the poet appears to have been conscious of this difficulty, as he makes Pentheus thireaten to put a stop to it (1. 545, 1036); and the king is only prevented from actually doing so by his anxiety to capture the Lydian stranger; but as soon as he has succeeded in this object, he becomes hopelessly entangled in toils that leave him no chance of carrying out his threat. The choral metres, a conspectus of which is given at the close of the volume, are all of them admirably adapted to give expression to the varied emotions of the votaries of Dionysus. 604-64I, is well suited as a transition from the hurried excitement of the preceding scene, to the quieter Iambic verses which immediately follow it. Of the versification of the Bacchae, according to Ilartung's Eu:. In listening to the first speech, we find ourselves in a wonderland where all is marvellous, and we feel that here, at any rate, we have one who, like Aristophanes in his lighter moods, would have been able to appreciate a creation of the fancy like the MIidsummzer Nighzt's Dream of our own poet. The subject of this quiet and easy conversation gives that repose so necessary to the mind, after the tumultuous bustle of the preceding scenes, and perfectly contrasts the scene of horror that immediately succeeds'.' Another instance of the 'lull before the storm' is noticed by a recent writer on Calderon, in 'the pretty pastoral scene' in the play called the Hair of Absalom where the sheep-shearers are pleasantly conversing with Tamar just before the arrival of Amnon and his brothers3. Is the poet who here upholds the honour of Dionysus, and maintains the belief in his divinity, the same as he who, elsewhere, allows his characters to rail unrebuked against the legends of the popular mythology, and even to deny the wisdom of Apollo, the justice of Athene, the righteousness of Zeus2, and to speak in vague terms of the very existence of the greatest of the gods'? The gem is characterized by Mr King as 'Etruscan work of the most finished kind' (King and Munro's Horace, Epod. The original is in the Berlin cabinet, and a cast of it is included in the collection mentioned on p. The woodcut is enlarged to double the scale of the gem. His wound is here indicated by a bandage round his ankle and by the 'writhing anguish' expressed in his general attitude. A Maenad with head tossed back and streaming hair, and with arms violently extended, holding a short sword in her right and part of a slain animal in her left; she wears the long chiton, and over it the nebris.

]]Ti; Woermann, Uebcr deln landschaftlichen Aatursinn der Griechcen nmd Riomer, Miinchen, 1871, pp. The chorus in Greek tragedy is, again and again, the interpreter to the audience of the inner meaning of the action of the play; and the moral reflexions which are to be found in the lyrical portions of the Bacchae seem in several instances to be all the more likely to be meant to express the poet's own opinions, when we observe that they are not entirely in keeping S. We are told, for example, that 'to be knowing is not to be wise'; that, in other words, it is folly to be wise in one's own conceit (395); that the true wisdom consists in holding aloof from those who set themselves up to be wiser than their fellows, and in acquiescing contentedly in the common sense of ordinary men (427). The most memorable instance of the same subject is the masterpiece of Scopas which is the theme of several epigrams of the Greek Anthology (Alnth. On the other hand, in a relief formerly in the Borghese collection (Winckelmann, no. He elsewhere recognises a fresh development of Greek art under the influence of Tragedy, a development which shewed itself not only in the groups of that sculptor but also in single figures like that of his Maenad (p. The height of the original is I foot, 5 inches; the woodcut is copied from the engraving in the British i Museum Marbles x plate 35. She is seated under a tree and has just opened the sacred basket, out of which a snake is seen emerging. DANCING FAUN, with head tossed back and hair floating in the breeze, bunches of grapes in his right hand, and a panther's skin over his right arm. with Latin translation by Aemilius Portus, Heidelberg, I597; (3) Paul Stephens, Geneva, 1602 [the ed. I855 [2 vols., with full ayparatus criticus at the end of each volume]; (II) A. I867 [3 vols., with a few of the more important various readings and emendations at the foot of the page]; (12) Nauck ed. with introduction 'de Euripidis vita' &c., and 'annotatio critica']; (I3) 1W.

Indeed, it could hardly have been undertaken at all, but for the existence of that excellent institution, the University Long Vacation,-an institution against which a few bold hands have been lately lifted, but which nevertheless, in the PREFA CE.

nii form in which we are familiar with it in the Colleges of Cambridge, where residence under due limitations is allowed but not enforced, has a value, for teachers and learners alike, which it would be difficult to overestimate.

The Iambic lines, in general, are remarkable for the large number of resolved feet, which is one of the marks of the poet's later manner'. Of both the messengers' speeches we may almost say, as has been lately said of the dramas of Calderon, that 'the scenery is lighted up with unknown and preternatural splendour.' The account of the catastrophe in the second speech is remarkably vigorous. 1 Im Labyrinth der Thilecr hinzuschleichen, Dann diesen Felsen zu r-steigenz, VTon den der Quell sich ewig sprude Ind stiirzt, Das ist die Lust, die solche Pfade wiirzt! A partial solution of the difficulty is not far to seek. The oracle of the god, who had caused his fall, replied that only he that had dealt the wound could cure the same, and the king was healed by Achilles with the rust of his spear. S.; the woodcut is borrowed from the vignette of King's Antique Gems and Ri Zngs, where the copy is drawn to twice the actual size of the gem. The lamp was found at Dali, the ancient Idalium, in 1871, and was sent by Mr Consul Sandwith to the Rev.

But the poet appears to have been conscious of this difficulty, as he makes Pentheus thireaten to put a stop to it (1. 545, 1036); and the king is only prevented from actually doing so by his anxiety to capture the Lydian stranger; but as soon as he has succeeded in this object, he becomes hopelessly entangled in toils that leave him no chance of carrying out his threat. The choral metres, a conspectus of which is given at the close of the volume, are all of them admirably adapted to give expression to the varied emotions of the votaries of Dionysus. 604-64I, is well suited as a transition from the hurried excitement of the preceding scene, to the quieter Iambic verses which immediately follow it. Of the versification of the Bacchae, according to Ilartung's Eu:. In listening to the first speech, we find ourselves in a wonderland where all is marvellous, and we feel that here, at any rate, we have one who, like Aristophanes in his lighter moods, would have been able to appreciate a creation of the fancy like the MIidsummzer Nighzt's Dream of our own poet. The subject of this quiet and easy conversation gives that repose so necessary to the mind, after the tumultuous bustle of the preceding scenes, and perfectly contrasts the scene of horror that immediately succeeds'.' Another instance of the 'lull before the storm' is noticed by a recent writer on Calderon, in 'the pretty pastoral scene' in the play called the Hair of Absalom where the sheep-shearers are pleasantly conversing with Tamar just before the arrival of Amnon and his brothers3. Is the poet who here upholds the honour of Dionysus, and maintains the belief in his divinity, the same as he who, elsewhere, allows his characters to rail unrebuked against the legends of the popular mythology, and even to deny the wisdom of Apollo, the justice of Athene, the righteousness of Zeus2, and to speak in vague terms of the very existence of the greatest of the gods'? The gem is characterized by Mr King as 'Etruscan work of the most finished kind' (King and Munro's Horace, Epod. The original is in the Berlin cabinet, and a cast of it is included in the collection mentioned on p. The woodcut is enlarged to double the scale of the gem. His wound is here indicated by a bandage round his ankle and by the 'writhing anguish' expressed in his general attitude. A Maenad with head tossed back and streaming hair, and with arms violently extended, holding a short sword in her right and part of a slain animal in her left; she wears the long chiton, and over it the nebris.

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