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Posted by / 10-Apr-2017 05:57

He or she might be attracted by the photo someone posts: a pretty young woman, or a soldier in uniform. For men, the female scammer presents herself to her target as “young and vulnerable.”For women, the man-on-the-make may say he’s wealthy or of high status, like a businessman or top soldier.

Why not, thought Ellen, even though she’d previously dipped her toe in the pool of men online, and found them wanting. Ellen says “Dave” told her he had been left a sizeable inheritance offshore, but because of a lawyer’s incompetence, he had to clear some debts before he could sell the assets.“I am of the nature that I would help anybody,” Ellen says.

His picture was that of a somewhat handsome, balding middle-aged man. She says she travelled to London and Madrid to meet people who “Dave” said would get her money back and each time came home with a diminished bank balance.

As Ellen and “Dave” chatted online and occasionally on the phone, she says she told her he was of Swedish descent and was living in Los Angeles. Ellen says she sent the first few thousand to help “Dave” out – and the rest followed as an attempt to get back the money she’d lost.“It was, ‘You’ve already sent me this money — how am I supposed to pay you back if we don’t go to the next step? “And at one point I said, ‘If this keeps up, I’m going to be bankrupt.’ ”Even Ellen is at a loss to explain how an adult, who says she had accumulated a tidy nest egg by growing an inheritance through canny property purchases, could be taken in by the fraudsters.“It’s like I was living in a fog,” Ellen says.

She ultimately reported a loss of

Why not, thought Ellen, even though she’d previously dipped her toe in the pool of men online, and found them wanting. Ellen says “Dave” told her he had been left a sizeable inheritance offshore, but because of a lawyer’s incompetence, he had to clear some debts before he could sell the assets.“I am of the nature that I would help anybody,” Ellen says.

His picture was that of a somewhat handsome, balding middle-aged man. She says she travelled to London and Madrid to meet people who “Dave” said would get her money back and each time came home with a diminished bank balance.

As Ellen and “Dave” chatted online and occasionally on the phone, she says she told her he was of Swedish descent and was living in Los Angeles. Ellen says she sent the first few thousand to help “Dave” out – and the rest followed as an attempt to get back the money she’d lost.“It was, ‘You’ve already sent me this money — how am I supposed to pay you back if we don’t go to the next step? “And at one point I said, ‘If this keeps up, I’m going to be bankrupt.’ ”Even Ellen is at a loss to explain how an adult, who says she had accumulated a tidy nest egg by growing an inheritance through canny property purchases, could be taken in by the fraudsters.“It’s like I was living in a fog,” Ellen says.

She ultimately reported a loss of $1.332 million to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre, which compiles information and forwards it to law enforcement for investigation.

They referred her case to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in B. Authorities there are unable to confirm what happened to that complaint.

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Why not, thought Ellen, even though she’d previously dipped her toe in the pool of men online, and found them wanting. Ellen says “Dave” told her he had been left a sizeable inheritance offshore, but because of a lawyer’s incompetence, he had to clear some debts before he could sell the assets.“I am of the nature that I would help anybody,” Ellen says.His picture was that of a somewhat handsome, balding middle-aged man. She says she travelled to London and Madrid to meet people who “Dave” said would get her money back and each time came home with a diminished bank balance.As Ellen and “Dave” chatted online and occasionally on the phone, she says she told her he was of Swedish descent and was living in Los Angeles. Ellen says she sent the first few thousand to help “Dave” out – and the rest followed as an attempt to get back the money she’d lost.“It was, ‘You’ve already sent me this money — how am I supposed to pay you back if we don’t go to the next step? “And at one point I said, ‘If this keeps up, I’m going to be bankrupt.’ ”Even Ellen is at a loss to explain how an adult, who says she had accumulated a tidy nest egg by growing an inheritance through canny property purchases, could be taken in by the fraudsters.“It’s like I was living in a fog,” Ellen says.She ultimately reported a loss of $1.332 million to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre, which compiles information and forwards it to law enforcement for investigation.They referred her case to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in B. Authorities there are unable to confirm what happened to that complaint.

.332 million to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre, which compiles information and forwards it to law enforcement for investigation.

They referred her case to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in B. Authorities there are unable to confirm what happened to that complaint.

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